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20121201
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, exactly. so to you let's go to the defense of marriage act case. and this came out of new york. first of all explain how the defense of marriage act worked and how did this one case involving an 83-year-old woman in edie wind sore-- windsor raise the issue. >> well, the challenge here is to a provision in the defense of marriage act, section 3. and that defines for all federal purposes marriage is between one man and one womanment and by doing that it affects more than a thousand federal laws, everything from tax laws to social security and health and welfare benefits. the defense of marriage act was challenged by edie windsor from new york. she had a partner for over 40 years. they were married in 2007 in canada, a new york recognized their marriage when miss windsor's partner, her spouse died. her spouse left her entire estate to edie windsor. because of the defense of marriage act edie windsor was left with almost a 400,000 dollar federal estate tax that someone who was the spouse of an opposite sex coup weill not have had to pay. so their defense of marriage act can being challeng
was expected from new york state to maine. by last night, it was already on the way. >> the winds were fierce it was blowing the cars around and you could see the semi's were swerving. >> ifill: the storm also forced cancellation of hundreds of flights and the ripple effects reached as far west as san francisco. >> after i found out my flight had been canceled after four hours of waiting in the airport, i had to wait another three hour customer service line, which i didn't even get to the end of before the booth closed. >> ifill: about a 1,000 people spent christmas night on cots at dallas/fort worth international airport. by dawn, patience was wearing thin. one fed-up pilot apologized to his passengers over the loudspeaker, after they were forced to wait on the tarmac for almost five hours. >> ifill: by this evening, the worst of the weather was moving into new england. but in its wake, nearly 200,000 customers had lost power across the southeast and midwest, making home for the holidays unexpectedly cold and dark. >> warner: still to come on the "newshour": court-ordered treatment for the m
. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: a gunman at a school, mass casualties, and emergency crews-- the scene was eerily familiar and, once again, horrifying. this time, tragedy struck at a grade school in a small connecticut town. 20 of the 27 dead are children. we begin our coverage with president obama's emotional address to the nation this afternoon. >> we've endured too many of these tragedies in the past few years. and each time i learn the news, i react not as a president but as anybody else would, as a parent. and that was especially true today. i know there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those
corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the final weekend has now arrived before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and with it, more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts. in a last bid for a deal, president obama stated his terms face-to-face to top republicans and democrats. >> congressional leaders arrive ted white house this afternoon for their first group meeting with the president since november 16th. vice president biden and treasury secretary timothy geithner also attend. but there was little to suggest the makings of an 11th hour bargain. a source familiar with the meeting told the newshour its president is sticking with his offer from last friday. it included keeping the bush era tax break force the middl
. the attacks highlighted an upsurge in rebel assaults around damascus and elsewhere. "the new york times" reported the syrian military is now fighting back with scud missiles, firing at least a half dozen in recent days. against that backdrop, president obama announced tuesday that the u.s. will now formally recognize the syrian opposition movement. >> we've made a decision that the syrian opposition coalition is now inclusive enough, is reflective and representative enough of the syrian population, >> ifill: hours later, the friends of syria meeting in marrakech, morocco took the same step. the u.s. became one of 114 nations to endorse the syrian national council created just last month under international pressure. deputy secretary of state william burns: >> in a growing number of towns and villages, a new syria is being born, the regime of bashar al assad must and will go, the sooner he steps aside the better for all syrians. >> ifill: despite showing signs last week of a possible shift in russia's position, the decision did not go down well in moscow, which opposes outside action aga
: rising sea levels. today, new york city mayor michael bloomberg announced a new long-term initiative to protect the city from future natural disasters. he called for rebuilding vulnerable coastal areas, but dismissed again the idea of constructing a large sea-gate across the harbor. >> we're not going to abandon the waterfront. we're not going to abandon the rockaways or coney island or staten island's south shore. but we can't just rebuild what was there and hope for the best. we have to build smarter and stronger and more sustainably. >> woodruff: 350 miles south. the city of norfolk, virginia, is another coastal city vulnerable to sea level rise and extreme storms. but its mayor has said parts of his city might not be livable in the future. our producer, mike melia, traveled to norfolk recently to look at how it has been struggling with flooding and preparing for the next big storm. he worked with member station whro to bring us this report. it's part of our series-- working with public media partners across the country-- that we call "battleground dispatches." >> reporter: when r
columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. so david, where are we on this cliff, over, under, sideways. >> we're going backwards. i guess that is a good thing. >> backing away would be good. >> we're going towards the cliff. >> and so what happened is the election happened. obama wins. clearly he ran on raising tax or raising revenue from the top 2%. center piece. republicans are not stupid. they sort of understand that. so they went through a process the day after boehner said revenues but not rates, and some began to drift over, okay, rates, so you have had movement, until friday or yesterday, thursday, when tim geithner goes up there and delivers an ultimatum which is a chest thumping stick in the eye to the republicans. and all the migration suddenly stops and suddenly they get outraged apt are. and so they are back, they are going back to where grover norquist wants them to be because they are outraged because they feel they have been insulted is, that this is not a negotiation t a war. i think what had yesterday from the administration was a bit of negotiat
of pennsylvania, upstate new york and new hampshire. in some places, snow brought road travel to a standstill. at the same time, operations at major airports improved, with far fewer delays than earlier this week. in india, the embattled prime minister remained under pressure to take action against sexual assaults after a gang rape this month triggered violent protests. manmohan singh promised a thorough review of india's rape laws and efforts to expedite trials. meanwhile, police moved to quell a rally by about 500 students protesting the treatment of women as they moved toward a monument in new delhi. the students complained officials had declared the site off limits. >> ( translated ): we are taking out this peaceful protest. we don't have any conflict with the police. we have just come here to express our stand. all the students are expressing their opinions here as you can see so the police should allow all of us to pass through to the place. this is only our demand and nothing else. >> holman: the rape that ignited the protests was that of a 23- year-old woman attacked by six men, then
could be wrong. >> reporter: whatever the genetic recipe is, "new york times" media reporter and columnist david carr is certain it is wired into his d.n.a. did you come close to dying? >> yeah, quite a few times. >> reporter: carr has been clean and sober for 20 years now, but nearly lost everything after years of drug and alcohol addiction, all of it chronicled in his lyrical 2008 memoir the night of the gun. so you think there's probably some genes inside you that make you want this more than others? >> since i've been three or four years old, i would spin around until i got dizzy and then fall down. i think the desire to feel different than i feel right at this moment and see how pretty much baked in me. >> reporter: which brings us back to dr. schuckit's scientific saloon. >> the tests i take under the influence will determine how sensitive i am to alcohol. >> reporter: he designed the regime for a long-term study of 450 men. it's been underway for 30 years now. schuckit found those who get tipsy easily are about three times less likely to become alcoholics, but those wh
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9